Haggis – Peasant Food to Diasporic Icon

Written by Neil Gow on . Posted in food

Haggis - Peasant Food to Diasporic Icon
When the common question of country and food association is raised and the country in question is Scotland, two foods typically spring to mind – porridge and haggis.  While these two foods converge at one end of the food spectrum, in that oats (in the form of pin-head oatmeal) are a primary constituent of Haggis; at the other they have diverged to a significant degree.
Ann Hope succinctly describes this divergence in Caledonian Feast – “Strange that, while porridge was easily accepted throughout the British Empire – some would say it as an integral part – haggis remains a curiosity outside of Scotland, an unfamiliar object which calls forth defensive ribaldry in its own country”

Kaiseki in Kyoto Japan – A Regional Foodway

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

Kaiseki in Kyoto Japan - A Regional Foodway

If you visit one of the many farmers markets in the western world you are bound to come across at least one of them. They could be driving a Range Rover looking for a wild pheasant for a BBQ, or they could be a tattoo-smothered biker casing ingredients for a biscuit recipe.

They are bound to be taking photos on their phone, coffee or organic chai latte in hand, probably sporting a hangover from visiting a ‘too cool for school’ sake or wine bar the night before. They are out there. Like an edible mold, the food movement is creeping around the world and gaining followers wherever it goes.

Super star chefs saturate the media. Kids as young as 14 are on TV, boning knife in hand showing us how to strip a bull carcass. If it’s naturally line caught, vine ripened, organically grass and walnut fed, free rang and locally grown – then it is a hit.

Koyoshi Sushi – Some of The Best Sushi Osaka Has to Offer

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

Koyoshi Sushi - Some of The Best Sushi Osaka Has to Offer

The Sushi at Koyoshi Sushi in Osaka is an experience all in itself. The place only seats eight people and if you are not there at 6pm then you wait in a line out the front. It is not any normal line either – there is no maître de, no waiter or service person – there is no one to tell you how long you will wait – you just get in line behind the person in front of you and wait.

What Is Xiao Long Bao – Why They’re Little Basket Buns Of Course!

Written by Dean Lapthorne AKA Dr Noble Rot on . Posted in food

What Is Xiao Long Bao - Why They’re Little Basket Buns Of Course!

If you’ve never had Xiaolongbao before: strike one! Be gone with you, evil swine! Stemming from the outskirts of Shanghai, Xiaolongbao (literally meaning ‘little basket buns’) pack so much flavor  and punch and whatever they squeeze in there that you are always left craving for more. Much like re-runs of Walker, Texas Ranger.

South Pole Chef (Nankyoku Ryorinin) Food in Japanese Cinema – Part 2

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

South Pole Chef (Nankyoku Ryorinin) Food in Japanese Cinema – Part 2

Originally a novel by Jun Nishimura, Nankyoku Ryorinin (South Pole Chef) was adapted for screenplay and directed by Shuichi Okita. It was released in 2009. As of yet I am to find a version of this film with English subtitles, but I think the fact that I cannot understand all of what is being said enhances the semiotic readings of the text.

Sub-textual Meanings of Food in Japanese Cinema

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

Sub-textual Meanings of Food in Japanese Cinema

Food in cinema can communicate many things – it can symbolize cultural values, ideas, points of view, social status, ideologies and emotions. Most of the time as viewers, we understand without thinking, the symbolic meaning that a certain sign (or in this case food) has, and we soak it up like a paralyzed media sponge.