Major Appliances

@ The Markets

Delicious Scarpinocc Pasta Recipe

Written by Luisa Davis on . Posted in food

There is just something special about scarpinocc pasta. You can feel that love that was put into each and every piece of the shoe shaped pasta. It takes time and effort to make it, you need to individually pipe and fold each one, make the filling, and then cook them together.

However, there is truly nothing that can compare to homemade stuffed pasta. It is the type of taste that you don’t get often, and when you do get it, you remember that meal for a long time.

Scarpinocc may seem labor intensive (and it is), but the results are well worth the effort. Once you’ve got the basic recipe down, this is the type of recipe you can really make your own. You’ll be able to add your own flavors, fillings, and mix-ins once you’ve made it a few times. The hardest part is shaping the pasta, so remember to take your time and be gentle.

The Best Scarpinocc Recipe On The Internet

This particular pasta originated in northern Italy and is usually made with rich ingredients that are filling. It was created to resemble an old-fashioned wooden shoe that is typical of the Lombardy region.

Traditional scarpinocc is made with Taleggio, which is a washed rind cow’s milk that has a truly complex flavor that is equal party smooth, nutty, salty, and beefy. You’ll mix in some cream and a few other ingredients to immediately get transported back in time. You can mix scarpinocc with just about any type of sauce that you want, but most people agree that you shouldn’t mask the flavor with an overly heavy sauce if you want that authentic experience.

Homemade Scarpinocc Recipe

Servings: 7 Dozen Scarpinocc (approx)

Ingredients:

Pasta dough

  • 2 Packed Cups (360 Grams) 00 Flour
  • 1 Teaspoon Salt
  • 2 Large, Whole Eggs
  • 5 Additional Egg Yolks
  • 1½ Teaspoons Extra Virgin Olive Oil (high quality)

Taleggio Filling

  • 10½ Ounces Taleggio (Rind Included)
  • ⅓ Cup Heavy Cream
  • Large Pinch Of Finely Ground Black Pepper

Steps:

Pasta Dough

  1. Mix the flour and salt together. Place the mixture on a dry, clean work surface and form a mound. Create a well in the middle.
  2. Slowly add in the eggs, egg yolks, and olive oil. You want to mix with a fork within the well. Do not disturb the walls of the flour.
  3. Slowly start bringing the flour walls into the egg mixture. Continue mixing until you have a solid mass. The slower you do this, the better the results will be.
  4. Use your hands to start folding and forming the dough. Add the rest of the flour until you have a stiff, solid mass in your hands. If there are any dry clumps of flour, you can remove them.
  5. Knead the dough by driving the heel of your hand into the dough and rotating. Repeat until the dough has a silken, smooth texture.
  6. Tightly wrap the dough in cling wrap and allow it to rest for at least 30 minutes.

Taleggio Filling

  1. Take your Taleggio, cream, and black pepper and put them into a food processor. Process until they are very smooth. Put the filling into a pastry bag.
  2. Lightly flour your work surface and cut off a piece of dough. Be sure to keep the rest covered or it runs the risk of drying out, especially if this is your first time making these shapes.
  3. Rung the dough through a pasta machine at the largest setting. You should run it through 2-3 times, getting smaller until it is about 1/16th inch thick.
  4. Line a baking sheet with flour to prevent sticking.
  5. Cut the dough into 2-inch by 2.5-inch pieces (use a pastry wheel for the best results). You should work pretty fast to prevent the dough from drying out. For your first few times, it may be best to keep a spray bottle close by so that you can mist the dough.
  6. Pipe the filling into the middle of each rectangle. Leave about ¼ inch of a base around the edges.
  7. Fold the pasta over in thirds so that the seam is at the bottom. Use a little water to seal.
  8. Pinch the ends of the pasta to form a ridge at the top of the ends. Gently press the center of the pasta to form a dimple.
  9. Repeat with remaining pasta and filling.

Cooking Process

  1. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.
  2. Drop in the pasta and cook until it is 80% cooked through. It should take about 1.5 minutes.
  3. In a skillet, melt a few tablespoons of butter (the more butter, the more sauce).
  4. Add a tablespoon (or more if you want more sauce), and swirl together.
  5. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cooked pasta into the skillet and gently toss with the butter. Cook for another minute or two until you get your desired pasta texture.
  6. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to the serving plates.
  7. Spoon a little of the sauce on top and drizzle with balsamic butter.

If you have any leftover scarpinocc, you can freeze it. You will want them to dry just a bit before storing in an airtight container.

Pumpkin Scarpinocc Recipe

If you want to try something special, consider making this pumpkin scarpinocc. This is a recipe that has shown up on many menus in the last few years because the pairing of the cheese with the pumpkin, while it might sound a bit strange, is actually a fantastic, filling fall delicacy. You can have it any time of the year, however.

Follow the same recipe as above for the dough portion. The filling is what really shines here.

Fall Favorite: Pumpkin Scarpinocc Filled Pasta

Ingredients:

  • 14 Ounces Squash
  • ½ Cup Parmigiano Reggiano
  • 4 Ounces Whole Milk Ricotta
  • 4 Tablespoons Brown Butter

Steps:

  1. Roast about 14 ounces of squash at 400F until it is completely cooked through. To get the best roast, cut the squash in half, take out the seeds, season with pepper, salt, and butter on each half, and then roast.
  2. Allow the squash to completely cool before you start making the pasta dough.
  3. While the dough rests, combine the squash with the Parmigiano Reggiano, the whole milk ricotta, and brown butter in a food processor. Pulse until it is thick and very smooth. Season this mixture to taste and store in the refrigerator until you want to use it.
  4. Roll out your dough into a thin sheet. Use a glass or a cookie cutter, cut 3” rounds.
  5. Use a teaspoon of the filling at the center of each circle.
  6. Fold each circle in half to create the shape. Push down to press out any air pockets and seal them tightly with a bit of water on your finger.
  7. Stand the pasta up and press the dough into the appropriate shape. Use your finger to create a dimple in the middle.
  8. Transfer the finished product to a lightly floured surface.
  9. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.
  10. Drop in the pasta and cook until it is 80% cooked through. It should take about 1.5 minutes.
  11. In a skillet, melt a few tablespoons of butter (the more butter, the more sauce).
  12. Add a tablespoon (or more if you want more sauce), and swirl together.
  13. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the cooked pasta into the skillet and gently toss with the butter. Cook for another minute or two until you get your desired pasta texture.
  14. Use a slotted spoon to transfer to the serving plates.
  15. Spoon a little of the sauce on top and drizzle with balsamic butter.

This is a great recipe to add some Brussel sprouts or other hearty greens to if you are looking to add some nutritional value.

There are plenty of other fillings out there that you can add to this pasta. In reality, the name only comes from the shape, not the filling. You can get creative or go completely standard and make some interestingly shaped ravioli.

Remember that the shape may change your cooking times, so if you are playing around with your own recipes, be careful not to overcook the pasta before combining with the sauce. If you do this, you may be able to just heat the sauce separately and add it when you plate the pasta.

You won’t get the best intermingling of flavors, but it is better to do this than have mushy scarpinocc.

Luisa Davis

Luisa Davis

Luisa Davis is a frelance writer and foodie based in Portland, California. Though raised on her mother's homestyle Italian cooking, she has spent most of the last five years traveling and immersing herself in other countries' cuisines. Her work have been published in various publications, both online and offline.

Leave a comment

//