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Posts Tagged ‘birds’

Lessons From Duck Soup Recipes

Written by The Kitchen Hand on . Posted in food

The other night I was helping my child read a book about ducks, and I was amazed to learn that there are more than 83 types of duck in the world. Having grown up in Minnesota where duck hunting is a popular hobby, I started reflecting on all the different ways that I had eaten duck as a child. I started talking to my child about this and she started laughing. She said that Elmer Fudd was the only duck hunter she knew. I decided right then that I must introduce my child to wonderful duck soup recipes.

How to Roast a Turkey

Written by Sean Jewett on . Posted in the kitchen hand

how to roast a turkey, cooking turkey, turkey recipe

Here in the States we eat turkey on Thanksgiving, the third Thursday in November. Roast turkey has fond memories for many of us. A poorly roasted turkey has bad memories for many of us, too.

Dry, over cooked turkey can ruin a great family occasion. Our fear of under cooked poultry, combined with a lack of knowledge, has caused many turkey dinners to be dreadful. Roasting a turkey is actually very easy. It’s just a matter of some basic preparation. Bacon helps too.

Top 6 Best BBQ Grill Smokers – The perfect combo. Grill it, Smoke it !

Written by Peter Allen on . Posted in BBQ & Outdoor

best bbq smokers, grill smoker combo, combination grill

What is the best grill smoker combo – Summer 2020

Last Updated Jan 2020 – Its summer time – your kitchen feels cramped and lonely because everyone else is enjoying the open space of the garden with an ice-cold beer. You start to dream of a cooking space near a real fire. Cooking tasty racks of ribs… outside – like a Neanderthal. Well stop your whining and get out there – start a fire, cook some meat, drink a beer and beat your chest.

Guga Hunting – A Non-Contaminated Tradition

Written by Neil Gow on . Posted in food

guga hunt, traditional hunting, guga hunters

Flandrin and Montanari assert, Every culture is contaminated; every tradition is a child of history, and history is never static. Looking at this from a present day semantic perspective this would appear to hold true.

Todays current events become tomorrows historical ones. From a global perspective the statistical probability that what occurred today will repeat itself tomorrow, a veritable ground hog day, is so small that the assertion history is never static can be made with a high degree of assurance. By defining tradition as the passing of elements of a culture or religious beliefs from generation to generation, especially by oral communication, a case can be made for the parental role of history in the formulation and nurturing of a cultures traditions.

Assuming that not all contamination is malicious, the current level of globalisation and social interconnectedness has driven the possibility of culture isolation to the furthest extremes of the Amazonian rain forest or Papua New Guinean highlands. Given this assertion that nothing realistically can be fixed or unchanging, we need to accept culture and tradition as a moveable element, à la Flandrin and Montanari, dynamic and open to contestation.

Haggis – Peasant Food to Diasporic Icon

Written by Neil Gow on . Posted in food

what is haggis, haggis recipe, haggis food

When the common question of country and food association is raised and the country in question is Scotland, two foods typically spring to mind – porridge and haggis. While these two foods converge at one end of the food spectrum, in that oats (in the form of pin-head oatmeal) are a primary constituent of Haggis; at the other they have diverged to a significant degree.

Ann Hope succinctly describes this divergence in Caledonian Feast – “Strange that, while porridge was easily accepted throughout the British Empire – some would say it as an integral part – haggis remains a curiosity outside of Scotland, an unfamiliar object which calls forth defensive ribaldry in its own country”

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