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Posts Tagged ‘food story’

Indo Cat Shit Coffee – Kopi Luwak

Written by The Jaguar on . Posted in drink

kopi luwak coffee, price of kopi luwak, kopi luwak animal

Recently, a good friend of mine donated some kopi luwak coffee to my personal cause, which is, to taste the best of everything in life – possibly without working, because A. I am rich; so I can 
B. Working is tiring 
C. There a lot of people looking to work that can do the work for me cheaply
 D. I dont really have a job.

Cantine Florio – There is No Such Thing as a Marsala Wine Substitue

Written by Dean Lapthorne AKA Dr Noble Rot on . Posted in drink

cantine florio, marsala wine, what is marsala wine

On a recent ‘patient visit’ to Italy (where this good Doctor shall be relocating his drinking ‘practice’ as of late November) I stumbled into Sicily: yes, mafia land and home to scary dudes with lots of chest hair & gold jewelry. But its also home to some cracking vino and an absolute little gem called Marsala (which comes from, funnily enough, Marsala!).

What to Serve with Cabbage Rolls: Perfect Side Dishes

Written by Luisa Davis on . Posted in food

what to serve with cabbage rolls, side dish for cabbage rolls, cabbage rolls recipe

My love for cabbage rolls started way back in college, when one of my Ukrainian roommates cooked some for dinner. It was one of the heartiest and tastiest cabbage rolls I have ever tasted in my life, and I was instantly addicted. From then on, I’ve tried making cabbage rolls myself and perfecting my own recipe. I’ve even tried making different versions of the dish like the Ukrainian Golubtsi, the Polish Golabki, and the German Kohlrouladen. They’re all cabbage rolls, but each country has its own different twist on the dish so that no two are exactly alike.

What’s The Difference Between A Calzone and Stromboli? All About Different Types Of Pizza Rolls

Written by Luisa Davis on . Posted in food

what's the difference between a calzone and stromboli, what is a calzone, what is a stromboli
Pizza is delicious but inconvenient. I know that this might sound odd to you: after all, pizza is a finger food that’s broken up into perfectly sized portions. It’s also easy to share or even to store for leftovers later.

Despite these facts, I still prefer calzones and strombolis to pizza, especially when I’m only cooking or ordering for myself. Both of these pizza turnovers are easy to eat by hand. They’re usually perfectly sized for one person and come with just the right mix of cheese, sauce, and meat on the inside.

My Life with Goulash – A Personal Memoir (recipe inside)

Written by Anne Berry on . Posted in food

goulash, recipe for goulash, how to make goulash

In my early twenties, I was living in London, England and working in Hachette French Bookshop, a small establishment on a narrow lane off Regent Street.  It was a working holiday, following a student sojourn in France and a fanciful year in Cairo as a babysitter for a Canadian embassy family.  One day, I was returning home to north London when I passed a table of books on the sidewalk outside a small shop.

What is Japanese Sake? The Japanese Rice Wine

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in drink

what is japanese sake, sake drink, sake drink japan

Sake is a Japaese alcoholic drink made from rice – it is brewed similar to, but not the same as beer and it should be drunk young, as it does not age like wine. Contrary to popular belief most of the sake in Japan is drunk cold.

Warm sake is drunk usually only in winter and only certain types of sake should be heated. Sake goes well with many cuisines but naturally it is best with fish. (Gauntner 2002)

Kimchi – Korea’s Pride and Joy

Written by Christine (Hoi) Law on . Posted in food

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The world of Kimchi

 There is a common Korean saying that “if you have kimchi and rice, you have a meal.” Just like bread and butter in the western culture, kimchi and rice play a vital role in the Korean diet and has done so for many centuries as far back as 2,500 to 3,000 years ago. For those who are not familiar with it, the word “Kimchi” is used to describe the side dishes that come with every Korean meal.

They contain foods (often vegetables) preserved in salt or soy sauce that were stored (buried underground in a jar) for a period of time, and have gone through the fermentation process. Over time, kimchi has slowly evolved into its current form with the inclusion of additional ingredients like garlic, chili pepper, and salted seafood. It is not known when exactly the word “Kimchi” was invented; the related terms were used initially around the 16th century.

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