Posts Tagged ‘french cuisine’

Hobart Moules Mariniere

Written by Paris Hollywood on . Posted in food

Hobart Moules Mariniere

I believe at heart we’re all cavemen. Or cavewomen.

We’re driven much of the time by our unconscious desire to hunt, gather and reproduce. And once I’ve collected the chook eggs and cornered my wife in the bedroom the only thing left is to hunt an unsuspecting animal and feed it to my family.

Gastronomic Writing – Then & Now

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

Gastronomic Writing - Then & Now

A variety of different social, economic and cultural conditions were responsible for the interest in gastronomy in nineteenth century France. This interest (in gastronomy) contributed to the emergence of gastronomic writing, which not only fed from, but also fueled and became an integral part of this new 19thcentury trend.

Service à la Française; à la Russe & The Chef

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

In the 19thnineteenth century in Western Europe particularly France, the way the higher social classes dined changed dramatically. There was movement away from the dining style of Service à la française into a more diner friendly style of service known as Service à la russe. This gradual change is of gastronomic significance in that it altered the way society perceived food and the role of the cook who also at that time became known as the Chef.

French Duck Press – Gourmand’s Delight, Collector’s Pride

Written by The Kitchen Hand on . Posted in Tools & Gadgets

French Duck Press - Gourmand’s Delight, Collector’s Pride

Last Update Jan 2018 – If you are hearing the word “duck press” for the first time, it surely would have aroused your inquisitiveness, and put your grey cells to work. One thing is certain, your deductive powers would have given you hundreds of answers, but the last thing that you would think of as a duck press is a kitchen implement. Yes, a French duck press is a kitchen implement, which has a very special use. For anyone, who is privy to the food culture of France, would need no introduction to this fairly simple device.