Posts Tagged ‘gastronomy’

Anthony Bourdain No Reservations

Written by Jason Adamson on . Posted in food

I’m Anthony Bourdain – I write; I travel; I eat; and I’m hungry for more.                   

Anthony Bourdain – No Reservations

No Reservations is a food and travel program combined into one. In it the host Anthony Bourdain travels to, explores and eats at different places around the world. The focus of the show is primarily food and travel but it is the people and the culture behind each place that is conveyed through the story of food, that makes it so interesting.

How To Make A Burger Like A Boss

Written by Sean Jewett on . Posted in the kitchen hand

Burgers, burgers, burgers. There are so many takes on the humble little hamburger. From the boring, pre-made, scary-pink freezer patty (that can still be delicious if cooked well), to the gem of the hamburger world, Kobe beef.

We all have to admit that at one time or another even a fast food burger has hit the spot, and we all have fond memories of the summertime barbeque burgers. To me they are all great and each have a time and place. Let me tell you about one of my favorite burgers of all time, the real mushroom onion burger.

How Melbourne Found Its Drinking Groove

Written by Caroline Evans on . Posted in drink

“Tell me what you drink, and I shall tell you who you are”

I moved to Melbourne in 1999.  Working as a lawyer in the city I had plenty of time to drink in the myriad of small bars that wove through the urban landscape – they were a respite from work, a lounge room in the city to meet friends, a safe place where you could sit to relax.

I assumed that that was the way the city had always been – bars, along with food and the coffee scene, defining inner Melbourne for me.  It was very different from the city I had grown up in – Canberra – and even from Sydney, where I had just moved from, where the bars were bigger, less personal, flashier.  But this wasn’t the case.  Melbourne, on the bar front, is actually a babe in the woods, albeit a pretty good-looking one that’s grown up very, very fast.

Guga Hunting – A Non-Contaminated Tradition

Written by Neil Gow on . Posted in food

Guga Hunting – A Non-Contaminated Tradition

Flandrin and Montanari assert, Every culture is contaminated; every tradition is a child of history, and history is never static. Looking at this from a present day semantic perspective this would appear to hold true.

Todays current events become tomorrows historical ones. From a global perspective the statistical probability that what occurred today will repeat itself tomorrow, a veritable ground hog day, is so small that the assertion history is never static can be made with a high degree of assurance. By defining tradition as the passing of elements of a culture or religious beliefs from generation to generation, especially by oral communication, a case can be made for the parental role of history in the formulation and nurturing of a cultures traditions.

Assuming that not all contamination is malicious, the current level of globalisation and social interconnectedness has driven the possibility of culture isolation to the furthest extremes of the Amazonian rain forest or Papua New Guinean highlands. Given this assertion that nothing realistically can be fixed or unchanging, we need to accept culture and tradition as a moveable element, à la Flandrin and Montanari, dynamic and open to contestation.

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